AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

One of the first projects supported by FFEM at its inception sought to improve water resource management in the Jordan River Basin. That was back in 1994. Since then, FFEM has worked ceaselessly to increase and structure its action to improve the resilience of aquatic ecosystems, from continental waters to the high seas.

OUR ACTION TODAY

The FFEM’s work is guided by this future agreement as well as France’s commitments, particularly in the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, the conventions and strategies of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the Regional Seas Conventions (RSC). In this context, the FFEM supports projects to manage and restore aquatic ecosystems, particularly via NbS and by bolstering the resilience of local populations.
Voiliers Mauritanie Afrique
MANAGEMENT, PROTECTION, RESILIENCE
Fonds sous Marins

Ocean governance

Départ Lorient equipage salue depuis Tara

Ocean governance

In the oceans, climate change does not only lead to sea-level rise and coral bleaching. Combined with increased pressure on natural resources, it is also changing the structure of fish communities, with affects the economy and food security. This is exacerbated by pollution (particularly plastic and noise pollution) and the appearance of invasive species. To protect oceans, the FFEM is calling for improved practices in exclusive economic zones (EEZs) and the creation of high seas protected areas. To date, marine protected areas cover an estimated 8.1% of the world’s oceans1, and many of them do not seem to be managed appropriately or effectively.

The socio-environmental resilience of coastal areas

Mer des Sargasses © Erwan Amice

The socio-environmental resilience of coastal areas

Coastal areas and Small Island Developing States (SIDS) are particularly vulnerable to climate change due to mean sea-level rise and the increasing frequency of extreme weather events. This vulnerability is exacerbated by the deepening degradation of coastal ecosystems, caused by the artificialisation of coastlines, the extraction of marine materials (sand and coral), and the increasing number of dams. The pandemic has also greatly affected coastal and island economies, making it more important than ever to increase support for blue industries that protect biodiversity.

To strengthen the resilience of land-sea interface areas and their populations, the FFEM funds projects to protect, restore, and rehabilitate coastal ecosystems (mangroves, seagrass beds, reefs, and coastal forests). This also helps strengthen the social resilience of local populations.

Freshwater ecosystem preservation

bénin-EI-AFD-projet-WaSAf

Freshwater ecosystem preservation

Though freshwater ecosystems represent just 2.8% of the total quantity of water available worldwide, they are critical to biodiversity and human health. However, they are now heavily impacted by the effects of climate change (droughts, floods) and human pressures such as urbanisation, poorly planned infrastructure, and pollution. The intensification of farming and other activities in watersheds increases the risk that surface and groundwater quality will be degraded.

The FFEM aims to conserve freshwater ecosystems to ensure the quality and availability of freshwater resources, along with equitable access. We are particularly interested in NbS and the freshwater saltwater interface to improve flood risk management, groundwater replenishment, and the preservation of biodiversity reservoirs.

89
aquatic ecosystem projects financed since 1995
€116 M
committed to aquatic ecosystems over the past 25 years

A multidisciplinary approach

Unsustainable human activities threaten aquatic ecosystems both directly (e.g., unsustainable fishing) and indirectly (e.g., plastic or chemical pollution spread via runoff, waterways, wind or rain). To protect aquatic ecosystems, their biodiversity, and their essential role in climate regulation, restoration and conservation efforts must go hand-in-hand with changes in human behaviour. The FFEM therefore supports aquatic ecosystem projects that address the convergence between biodiversity, climate, and pollution.

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capitalization

Evaluation of AFD and FFEM contributions to biodiversity conservation trust funds (2005-2019)

Among the eight CTFs supported by AFD and  FFEM since 2005 and which are the subject of  t

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Mar 2024
strategic document

Strategy document 2023-2026

Strategy document 2023-2026

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Feb 2023
evaluation

Evaluation of AFD and FFEM contributions to biodiversity conservation trust funds (2005-2019)

Among the eight CTFs supported by AFD and  FFEM since 2005 and which are the subject of  t

...
Mar 2024
Brochure

Aquatic ecosystems resilience

High seas, coastlines, wetlands, and freshwater hydrosystems: their role is crucial for climate regu

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Oct 2023
Brochure

Aquatic Ecosystems at FFEM

Since its creation in 1994, international waters and aquatic ecosystems have remained two of the FFE

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Jun 2021
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